Differentiating Graphic Organizers

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Do you ever feel like this?

Differentiation has become one of the “dirty” words in many teachers’ minds.  At times, it feels like a hoop we are required to jump through or something we put in our lesson plans in case an administrator looks at them.  However, there are tweaks we can make to what we do to differentiate in meaningful ways.  Take graphic organizers for example.  Using them is second nature to us, and we use them without putting much thought into them, but they are easily differentiated to be more meaningful and effective.

Here are some straightforward and “easy” ways to differentiate graphic organizers.

 

  Gifted and High Achievers On-Level Learners Students Needing Support
Choice of Organizers Students generate their own organizers that match the purpose and content being studied. Students select from two or three teacher provided graphic organizers that match purpose and topic being studied. Student completes the teacher provided the organizer that best matches the purpose and topic being studied.
Differentiating One Organizer for Three Levels Teacher provides students a completed organizer that contains errors.   Students work to find and correct errors; error analysis. Students complete the provided blank organizer. Students are given a partially completed organizer and are required to fill in missing pieces of information, and/or students are given word banks to select from in order to complete the organizer.
Differentiating Resources Needed to Complete Organizers Students use a variety of resources to complete the organizer without specific guidance from the teacher. Students are given specific resources to use in order to complete the organizer. Students are provided specific resources to use as well as page numbers in order to complete the organizer.